Skip to main content

Narrative Methods In Clinical Practice: The Use Of Storytelling For Sustainable Change week-end workshop intensives


Week-end Intensives:
Sat Feb. 6  1-5 pm and Sun Feb. 7 noon - 4 pm at
Simple Studios, 134 W. 29th St. 2nd Floor New York NY
  $180 register for NYC location

Sat. March 5  1-5 pm and Sun March 6 noon - 4 pm at
Lifestage, Inc  496 Smithtown Bypass Suite 202 Smithtown NY
$180  register for Long Island location

This course is offered by Lifestage, Inc, an approved provider of Continuing Education for social workers by the New York State Education Department's Board for Social Work.   8 Contact hours

This training will explore the power of story from the standpoint of listener and storyteller, the impact of social and cultural narratives on a person's inner life and provide tools for crafting stories that have maximum impact on the listener.


Narratives about one's abilities, strengths, potential and place in the world are woven into an implicit sense of self that is a powerful driver of perceptions and choices. Whether these narratives are positive or negative, they become self-reinforcing. But studies show that they can be changed and that changing them can redirect the course of a person's life. 

Storytelling skills have been shown to fine tune listening, and strengthen the capacity to  rewrite personal narratives. Participants will craft a story drawn from their own professional experience, using the classic 5-beat story structure that studies show is essential to empathy and emotional connection in shaping narratives that have maximum influence on the listener. The course culminates with the sharing of these stories in the group. The experience of choosing, crafting and sharing a story and the impact of this process on the story's meaning will be discussed.

Social workers in treatment and academic settings can empower clients to stay the course through the uncertainties and challenges of change by working with internal and social narratives that implicitly and explicitly impact peoples' lives and sense of self. This training will explore the power of story from the standpoint of listener and storyteller, the impact of social and cultural narratives on a person's inner life and provide tools for crafting stories that educate and empower others. The experiential portions will provide guidance for using stories in practice and discussion portions include evidence for narrative approaches to produce sustainable change from the literature. 

You will learn:

The relationship between personal narrative and suffering, healing and well-being;

The classic 5-part story structure and how to use it to maximize the power of a story;

The ways stories shape identity and can be used for healing and empowerment in clinical treatment;

Cultural narratives that inform individuals' perspectives and perception of self;

Current neuroscience and social psychology research about storytelling and narrative forms in health education and in health care workers' impact on clients and trainees;


OBJECTIVES:
  • Identify the relationship between personal narrative and suffering, healing and well-being;
  • Identify the classic 5-part story structure and how to use it to maximize the power of a story;
  • Explore the ways stories shape identity and can be used for healing and empowerment in clinical treatment;
  • Identify the cultural narratives that inform individuals’ perspectives and perception of self;
  •  Discuss the neuroscience and social psychology research about storytelling and narrative forms in health education and in health;

INSTRUCTOR: JudeTreder-Wolff is a Licensed Clinical Social Worker, Certified Group Psychotherapist and Music Therapist, a writer/performer and trainer/consultant. She is President of Lifestage, Inc a consulting and training company that designs and facilitates arts-based training seminars, workshops and groups for professional and personal development. She facilitates monthly applied improvisation workshops for clinicians and educators on Long Island at Lifestage, Inc, and integrates applied improvisation and storytelling into training seminars she designs for corporate wellness programs and staff development workshops for a wide range of organizations in the field of human services as well as corporate settings.
She is host and creator of a monthly storytelling show “(mostly) TRUE THINGS” which features true stories told by individuals from all walks of life. Her recent solo storytelling show with original music – Crazytown: my first psychopath - was selected for the 2013 Midtown International Theater Festival in New York, an Official Choice of the 2012 Chicago and San Francisco Fringe Festivals, performed at Actors Theater Workshop, at The Pit-The Peoples Improv in New York, The Charles B. Wang Center at Stonybrook University, and The Conservatory New Jersey.. She studies improvisation at The Pit-The Peoples Improv, The New School and around the country through the Applied Improvisation Network. Her book Possible Futures: Creative Thinking For The Speed of Life explored the importance of creative development for in navigating 21st century life. Journal publications include The International Journal of Arts and Psychotherapy Special Issue on Addiction and Special Issue on HIV/AIDS, Music Therapy Perspectives, Clinical Social Work, and Recovery Press. She has been interviewed for articles that appeared in Chicago Sun Times, Los Angeles Times, Chicago Tribune, Orlando Sentinel, New York Newsday, New York Daily News, Woman's Day, and The Three Village Times. Her e-newsletter and blog Lives In Progress explore the role of creativity in personal and professional development.


Comments

Popular posts from this blog

Improvisation Games & Exercises For Developing Emotional Intelligence

Since September Lifestage has been offering a monthly training workshop exploring the use of improvisation to develop Emotional Intelligence. These workshops have been geared toward the work done by clinicians, educators and trainers who guide the process of personal change or professional development, but as it turns out we have enjoyed some interesting diversity among the participants -  managers, business owners with both employees and customers, community activists, and performers. 
    Below is a collection of the exercises we have used in the workshops, accompanied by some studies that supports their use. 


Why Improvisation?
Improvisation is a powerful way to become aware of mental habits and patterns. Reflecting on our inner experiences after engaging in an improvisation exercise provides an opportunity to decide whether our mental habits are effective and useful or self-limiting and obsolete. The tensions of the creative process and this kind of interpersonal interaction are a fa…

WARM-UP EXERCISES FOR GROUP WORK - For Therapeutic, Educational or Training Groups

Nicholas Wolff, LCSW, BCD, TEP, Director of Training at Lifestage, Inc and Jude Treder-Wolff, LCSW, RMT, CGP, Trainer/consultant and writer/performer. Follow on twitter @JuTrWolff


   “To begin assembly one must have the right attitude,” goes a Japanese instruction for assembling a particular object, as quoted in Zen and the Art of Motorcyle Maintenance. The "right attitude" is one that best serves the action we are preparing to engage in, just as an athlete warms up his/her muscles before using them in the stress of a work-out or game. Psychological and emotional "muscles" that are properly warmed up will perform more effectively and make it less likely that we will experience strain or allow fear to produce a shut-out when things get rolling.
    The right warm-up makes everything learned in a training situation or classroom more accessible and immediately useful to the trainee/student. New skills and knowledge - in education, personal growth or a professional train…

The Emotional Intelligence of Nelson Mandela

Nelson Mandela famously forgave the people who imprisoned him, an extraordinary thing especially since they were willing actors in an abusive system, one that imposed decades of indescribable suffering and violence on millions of his people. He forgave Ronald Reagan and Margaret Thatcher for doing business with the apartheid regimeand would probably forgive members of the U.S. Congress and political pundits who labeled him a Communist and terrorist even upon the announcement of his death. 
     There were American diplomats who ignored the ignored the brutality and violence of the apartheid government and supported his imprisonment. Most of us would find that hard to take. Most of us struggle to accept being misjudged or unfairly labeled even when the consequences are simply emotional tensions. And in our sound bite culture, there is a rush to idolize a person with such a remarkable emotional capacity. We might miss the ways he was exactly like the rest of us and in doing that miss als…