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Showing posts from November, 2017

The Power Of Story To Impact Behavior Change-workshop handout

The ability to craft and deliver a story is a key professional skill that is even more valuable in the digital world, in which there are constant competing demands on peoples' attention. According to neuroscientist Paul Zak, who conducts research into what is happening in the brain when impacted by story, the ability to command and sustain attention is the core challenge to all of us who seek to deliver information and impact others in positive ways. "Any Hollywood writer will tell you that attention is a scarce resource," he writes in "How Stories Change The Brain" on UC-Berkeley's Greater Good website. "Movies, TV shows, and books always include “hooks” that make you turn the page, stay on the channel through the commercial, or keep you in a theater seat. Scientists liken attention to a spotlight. We are only able to shine it on a narrow area. If that area seems less interesting than some other area, our attention wanders."
TheScientific American

Good Games For Great Relationships: Strengthening Interpersonal Communication Through Applied Improvisation

The games used to train improvisers are particularly effective for developing interpersonal skills, because of the unique challenges of improvisation: to create something in real time collaboration with others, having no script, no director, no rehearsal and no preplanning. Improvisers closely listen, observe, notice, and support one another. And through learning to read and respond to what our improv partners are expressing through play, we can cultivate skills that are essential for real life relationships. 
 The concept that play has serious learning value in American social-emotional development and education was originated by social service worker Neva Boyd, who was prominent in the first half of the 20th century and very involved with the playground and recreation movement.  In her essay The Theory Of Play she wrote that through games "children learn language skills, socialization, cooperation, and even morality, because all must agree on the rules and abide by them for a g…